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Archive for the ‘Giuliani’ Category

In speaking at how McCain and Huckabee are trying to redefine Republican and Conservatism, Rush Limbaugh had this to say:

“I can see possibly not supporting the Republican nominee this election, and I never thought that I would say that in my life.”

Rush continues to plea with Republicans and Conservatives to wake up and pay attention to what is happening to the Republican party by specifically those candidates. Rush has expressed that as far as Rudy Giuliani, Mitt Romney, and Fred Thompson goes, each has or had their liberal “moments” but none are trying to “redefine” the GOP or have said that the principles of Reagan Conservatism is dead.

Former President Reagan did all he could to unite fiscal, social, and political conservatives in positive ways. Today on Sean Hannity, Tom Delay exposed how dangerous and what a grenade John McCain  would be to the Republican party. Likewise Huckabee is trying to advance that Reaganism is out-dated and dead.

Show Highlight: McCain and Huckabee are running on the idea that Reagan conservatism is outdated, and needs to be redefined to fit their liberal positions. Mitt, Rudy, and Fred want to advance that legacy. (Rush 24/7 Members: Listen Here)

Rush stresses every show that there is no one perfect candidate, but at least Rudy is quite open that he is anti-life (pro-abortion), and supports gay marriage. Mitt Romney can be prone to a little pandering, ie) the incident in Michigan where he is oft-quoted as suggesting that the federal government funnel $20 billion to bring jobs back to the state. Rush defends Fred Thompson and the one candidate that has been consistently conservative and that Mitt Romney speaks conservatism.

I suspect that Fred Thompson’s disappointing showing in South Carolina is frustrating for Rush. I do believe however that Mitt Romney will continue to be the strength the Republican party needs. He is a quick and responsive study. His stances have matured over the years, and we all couldn’t be more happy about that. I think Glenn Beck said today that Pres. John Kennedy would be a political conservative in this day and age. Times are a changing. Someone who might have been a moderate a decade ago would easily be a conservative today. The disturbing trend is when you see the phenomenal rise in “liberal Republicans” who seek to stamp out conservatism and the base of the Republican party.

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From Hugh Hewitt:

MCCAIN HAS VOTED FOR HIGHER TAXES MORE THAN 50 TIMES

Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA): “We Would Have Had A Much Bigger Tax Cut If It Was Not For John McCain.” (Kathryn Jean Lopez, “A Conservative Case Against McCain,” National Review, article.nationalreview.com, 1/14/08, Accessed 1/18/08)

In His Twenty-Year Senate Career, John McCain Has Voted At Least Fifty-Two Times For Higher Taxes On The American People – That’s More Than Twice A Year.*

McCain Was One Of Only Two Republican Senators To Vote Against President Bush’s 2001 Tax Cuts And One Of Only Three Republican Senators To Vote Against President Bush’s 2003 Tax Cuts.  (H.R. 1836, Senate Vote #170, Conference Report Agreed To: 58-33: R 46-2, D 12-31, 5/26/01, McCain Voted Nay; Lori Nitschke and Wendy Boudreau, “Provisions Of The Tax Law,” CQ Weekly, 6/9/01; H.R. 2, Senate Vote #179, Passed 51-49: R 48-3, D 3-45, I 0-1, 5/15/03, McCain Voted Nay; H.R. 2, Senate Vote #196, Conference Report Agreed To 51-50: R 48-3, D 2-46, I 0-1, With Vice President Cheney Casting A “Yea” Vote, 5/23/03, McCain Voted Nay)

  • And McCain Questioned The “Economic Premises” Of The Bush Tax Cuts. “Nor does McCain spare the rod in rejecting Bush’s tax cuts, especially the $1.37 trillion blockbuster Bush pushed through Congress in 2001, criticizing its economic premises and its likely impact. At best, it’s a long-term economic stimulus, not the immediate boost the economy needs, McCain said. ‘All the predicates for the 2001 tax cuts and all the predictions for its results were absolutely, completely wrong,’ he said. And it will worsen the deficit before it ever helps the economy, he added.” (John Farmer, Op-Ed, “Maverick McCain Maintains A National Constituency,” Newhouse News Service, 2/24/03)

McCain Has Voted At Least Seven Times Against Repealing All Or Part Of Death Tax Through 2002. (H.R. 8, CQ Vote #195: Rejected 44-54: R 3-51; D 41-3, 7/14/00, McCain Voted Yea; H.R. 1836, CQ Vote #124: Motion Rejected 43-56: R 2-47; D 41-9, 5/21/01, McCain Voted Yea; H.R. 1836, CQ Vote #135: Rejected 48-51: R 6-43; D 42-8, 5/22/01, McCain Voted Yea; H.R. 1836, CQ Vote #132: Motion Rejected 41-58: R 1-48; D 40-10, 5/22/01, McCain Voted Yea; H.R. 8, CQ Vote #149: Motion Rejected 44-54: R 4-43; D 39-11; I 1-0, 6/12/02, McCain Voted Yea; H.R. 8, Senate Vote #151, Motion Rejected: 54-44, McCain Voted Nay, 6/12/02; S. 1730, Senate Vote 28, Amendment Agreed To: 56-42, McCain Voted Nay, 2/13/02)

And there’s even more detail here as well.

Also at NRO there’s a post title “A Conservative Case Against McCain” by Kathryn Jean Lopez worth reading.

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From MyManMitt:

Pre-Florida GOP Election Scorecard

posted by Jeff Fuller | 1:01 AM | permalink

Election Scorecard:
Delegate Count (via CNN):

Romney

Romney

72

McCain

McCain

38

Huckabee

Huckabee

29

Thompson

Thompson

8

Paul

Paul

6

Giuliani

Giuliani

2

Hunter

Hunter

1

Winner: Mitt Romney (he has more delegates than the other three remaining “viable” candidates–Huckabee, McCain, and Rudy–COMBINED)

Total Cumulative Vote Tally (after 95% of SC vote)–1,679,675 votes cast thusfar in GOP contests (excluding Hunter and Keyes):

Romney – 537,070 — 32%
McCain – 513,131 — 30%
Huckabee – 339,801 — 20%
Thompson – 121,628– 7%
Paul – 107,428 — 6%
Giuliani – 60,617 — 4%
Winner: Mitt Romney
Medals Count (can you tell who I support?):
Romney – 3 Gold, 2 Silver
McCain – 2 Gold, 1 Silver, 1 Bronze
Huckabee – 1 Gold, 1 Silver, 2 Bronze
Thompson – 1 Silver, 1 Bronze
Paul -1 Silver
Hunter – 1 Bronze
Giuliani – NADA

Winner: Mitt Romney

Which candidate has both RAISED the most money AND has the biggest purse to continue on to future states? Mitt Romney

Which candidate has won the largest plurality of voters in any contest thusfar? Mitt Romney (39% of the vote, Romney’s total in Michigan, is the highest percentage of any candidate on either side in any contested state thusfar)

Which candidate won the most demographically diverse and most populous state thusfar? Mitt Romney (significant Urban, Suburban, and rural populations in MI)

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RS Overnight Poll: Post SC, who will you vote for?

 

Redstate

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From Politico:

Mitt Romney won the Republican presidential caucuses in Nevada Saturday, as Republicans were still voting in their South Carolina primary.

CNN has only 10% at the money and Romney has

Romney 56%

McCain 12%

Paul 12%

Huckabee 8%

Thompson 8%

Giuliani 3%

Way to go Gov. Romney!!!!

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This afternoon, George Bennett at the Palm Beach Post looked at Mayor Giuliani’s newly released Florida TV ad, “Quotes.”

 While Governor Romney is quoted in the ad, Bennett found that the full context of the Governor’s remarks isn’t something that Mayor Giuliani would want Florida voters to hear:

About that Mitt quote in Rudy’s ad…

 The kicker to a new Rudy Giuliani ad in Florida is this quote from Mitt Romney: “Mayor Giuliani has a great record of cutting taxes.”

 Romney indeed said it on CNBC last October — but then went on to say Giuliani left “excessive deficits” when he departed as mayor of New York.

 The full context after the jump…..

 Kudlow: “John McCain says the line-item veto is essential. Mr. Giuliani I think is not sure. Where do you come out on that?”

 Romney: “John McCain’s right on that one. The line-item veto is the best tool the President has to reign in excessive spending, and Mayor Giuliani has a great record of cutting taxes and cutting spending, although, according to the Mayor, Mayor Bloomberg, that followed him, he said that he left excessive deficits for him. But he’s cut spending, he cut taxes, I cut spending, I cut taxes. But the real difference between us is that when it came to the line-item veto, I’m in favor of it. I used it 844 times, and he went all the way to the Supreme Court to take it away from the President, and it was not about a constitutional issue as he said, it was about getting more money for New York City. That’s the very reason a line-item veto should be there, is to take away the kind of special deals that certain cities get.”

 Here’s the YouTube of the quoted exchange between Larry Kudlow and Governor Romney in October 2007:

 

 

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About a dozen senior campaign staffers for Rudy Giuliani are forgoing their January paychecks, a sign of possible money trouble for the Republican presidential candidate and last year’s national front-runner.

“We have enough money, but we could always use more money,” said Mike DuHaime, Giuliani’s campaign manager and one of those who now is working for free. “We want to make sure we have enough to win.”

At the end of December, the campaign had $12.7 million cash on hand, $7 million of which could be used for the primary, DuHaime said Friday. He disputed the notion of a cash-strapped operation and said Giuliani continues to bring in money; several fundraisers are scheduled this week in Florida.

The former New York mayor has yet to win a contest and is counting on a victory in delegate-rich Florida on Jan. 29 to prove his candidacy is viable heading into the multistate contests slated for Feb. 5, where he believes he can prevail in states such as California and Illinois.

It’s an unorthodox and costly strategy because Florida and states that follow have some of the most expensive media markets in the country. And with so many states voting in such a short time period, candidates can do little else but rely on paid media _ and news coverage _ to get out their message.

Republican strategists estimate that it will cost roughly $35 million to run one week of heavy levels of ads in the two dozen states that hold contests on Feb. 5.

Giuliani has struggled to grab his share of the spotlight from rivals Mike Huckabee, winner in Iowa, and Sen. John McCain, the victor in New Hampshire, as well as Mitt Romney. Recent polls show Giuliani, the undisputed leader in most 2007 national surveys, losing his top spot.

Read more here

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